Geological and geotechnical engineering: Consensus Reports

The division produces 60-70 reports per year. These reports are unique, authoritative expert evaluations. Each report is produced by a committee of experts selected by the Academy to address a particular statement of task and is subject to a rigorous, independent peer review. The experts who volunteer their time participating on study committees are vetted to make sure that the committee has the range of expertise needed to address the task, that they have a balance of perspectives, and to identify and eliminate members with conflicts of interest. All reports undergo a rigorous, independent peer review to assure that the statement of task has been addressed, that conclusions are adequately supported, and that all important issues raised by the reviewers are addressed. Thus, while the reports represent views of the committee, they also are endorsed by the Academy.

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Monitoring and Sampling Approaches to Assess Underground Coal Mine Dust Exposures (2018)

Coal mine dust lung disease continues to be an important and complex problem affecting coal miners in the United States. Although the number of cases dropped precipitously since the late 1960s, an increase in the prevalence and severity of the disease has been documented since about 2000. Reliable information on respirable coal mine dust (RCMD) exposures in underground coal mines is crucial for predicting, reducing, and preventing mine workers... More >>

Report in Brief

A Decision Framework for Managing the Spirit Lake and Toutle River System at Mount St. Helens (2017)

Public Briefing: January 25 at 2:00 p.m. The public is invited to a presentation to learn about the findings of this study beginning at 2 p.m. on Thursday, January 25 at the Red Lion Hotel in Kelso. Register today! The massive volumes of volcanic debris deposited in the Spirit Lake and the Toutle River system during the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in southwest Washington State drastically changed the region and left its 50,00... More >>

Report in Brief

State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences (2016)

Earthquake-induced soil liquefaction is a leading cause of earthquake damage worldwide. Studies often describe liquefaction as the phenomena of seismic generation of excess porewater* pressures, which then soften granular soils. Many regions in the United States have been witness to liquefaction and its consequences, such as the inability of soils to support the foundations of buildings and other infrastructure. Past damage and destructio... More >>

Report in Brief

Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock (2015)

Characterizing and modeling fluid flow through fractured rock is vital to limiting the spread of chemical contaminants through rock features; for understanding where reservoirs of petroleum, water, or geothermal resources may form; and for engineering stable and resilient underground infrastructure. Over the past twenty years there have been significant advances in abilities to model and characterize these pathways, but significant challenge... More >>

Underground Engineering for Sustainable Urban Development (2013)

Humans have long relied on underground space for the placement of physical structures that allow our cities and developed areas to function safely. These include building foundations, underground utilities (e.g., power, gas, communications, waste management), transportation (e.g., roads and highways, subways, freight and passenger rail) and their supporting facilities. However, underground infrastructure is rarely engineered in coordination wit... More >>